Multifaceted challenges hampering education in Libya

CFP
The General Union of Libyan Students members conveyed to the UN team the need to have an education system that develops students to have the right skills for business. /CFP

Students in Libya are struggling to complete their studies due to a myriad of challenges, including a lack of equipment, teacher strikes, outdated curricula, and electricity cuts, a students union has told the United Nations.

While meeting a team of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), representatives from the General Union of Libyan Students expressed concerns over the multifaceted challenges hampering the progression of their education in the North African country.

“In the last two years there has not been one semester in which my dental studies at the University of Misrata haven’t been stopped due to issues like strikes or electricity,” said Musab Gusaibat, the President of the students union.

Union members conveyed to the UN team the need to have an education system that develops students to have the right skills for business, not one where the outdated curriculum means that even those who have access to education and complete their studies do not come out with the right skills, they said, calling for better coordination between ministries of education, planning, and economy.

“We are learning a curriculum from 1980 in buildings which sometimes don’t have bathrooms,” explained Musab, “we need a government committee to work with us to update the curriculum to meet market needs.”

After years of conflict, Libya is still working towards restoring lasting peace and stability. Together with the international community, the country is now focused on crafting a central government that will spur progress across all sectors, most of which laid idle as war ravaged on.

Ongoing deliberations aimed at reaching a deal between the warring factions are expected to culminate in agreements to steer the country towards stability and central governance.

With that stability, Libya’s students hope they can make progress in their education, and that the government can avail up-to-date curricula to competitively match current market needs.