Pledges to Global Fund exceed $14 billion target

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French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech at the opening of the fundraising day at the sixth World Fund Conference in Lyon, France, on October 10, 2019. (Photo by Nicolas Liponne/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech at the opening of the fundraising day at the sixth World Fund Conference in Lyon, France, on October 10, 2019. (Photo by Nicolas Liponne/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Pledges to finance the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria over the next three years surpassed the $14 billion target, according to the Global Fund Executive Director Peter Sands.

The amount ($14.02 billion) pledged at the Fund’s Sixth Replenishment Conference also exceeded $12.2 billion brought in during the last conference in 2016.

“Today’s remarkable demonstration of global solidarity shows that the world is committed to keep that promise, by working stronger, faster and together. Ending AIDS, TB and malaria is the fight that unites, and thank you to all our many partners for stepping up the fight,” Sands said.

A dozen heads of state and government, mostly from African countries, were attending the two-day conference of the Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

French President Emmanuel Macron, who hosted the conference in the city of Lyon, had urged governments to give generously to the cause in his opening speech.

The United States Congress has approved a commitment to $1.56 billion annually for the next three years. The United States and France ($1.427 billion) are the biggest donors. France increased its contribution by 20%, including an additional US$60 million announced by President Macron.

The United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and the European Union all increased their pledges at an average of 16% even as the Global Fund expanded its donor base.

Private donors pledged more than US$1 billion for the first time ever.

The donations from governments, philanthropic donors and the private sector will be used to finance health programs in more than 100 countries. Major recipients of the fund are Nigeria, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

The Global Fund said the money would help avert 234 million infections and save 16 million lives by 2023. Additionally, it would help to try to get back on track to end HIV, tuberculosis and malaria as epidemics by 2030.

The organization said the programs it has supported since its creation in 2002 have saved 32 million lives.

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