The situation in the CAR


The Central African Republic is now facing unprecedented levels of inter religious conflict between the majority Christian population and the minority Muslims. Humanitarian agencies are warning that reprisal attacks between vigilante groups of both religions risk the country collapsing into genocide. CCTV Africa’s Robert Nagila is in CAR analysing the situation on the ground. The current president makes his presence known in the capital

Members of the Seleka group now dominate the army and police force and patrol the streets of Bangui

Robert sent us these images of daily life in Bangui’s streets.

Health in the CAR Robert continues to report from us from the CAR, today he investigates the state of the Capital’s health facilities.

“Aid agencies say the health system has collapsed. The children’s hospital has no antibiotics and no X-ray machine. A lot of equipment was looted earlier on by the Seleka rebel alliance”

Children's hospital in Bangui
Children’s hospital in Bangui

 “This image is of the only functioning children’ s hospital in Bangui”

Women wash clothes in the children's hospital compound
Women wash clothes in the children’s hospital compound

“I spoke to Kabrou Gypsie, mother of a  two year old. She had to give her phone to the hospital in exchange for blood for her daughter who was suffering from malaria. She has no job and can’t afford hospital fees”

The pediatric hospital is so over stretched that aid agencies have erected a tent and extra beds for the children.

Tents house the overflow of patients
Tents house the overflow of patients

“There has been an increase in depression cases. Since March, this hospital has registered a thousand new cases. Almost all trauma has related from the conflict. Some victims were raped, others watched as family members were killed. There is no medication to treat them. “

Psychiatric hospital in Bangui, Women's Ward.
Psychiatric hospital in Bangui, Women’s Ward.

Below is the psychiatry men’s ward. Administrators say they see up to 30 cases a day.

A doctor stands in the doorway of the Men's psychiatric ward.
A doctor stands in the doorway of the Men’s psychiatric ward.

 Education in the CAR This is the building that houses the Education ministry together with fourth other different ministries in Bangui, CAR

Government ministeries in Bangui, CAR
Government ministries in Bangui, CAR

Robert visited Martyrs high school in Bangui, it is one of the biggest public secondary schools in the country. The education sector has also been affected by the crisis in CAR.  At Martyrs, the student population is supposed to be 2000 but that has jumped to over 10,000 according to the head master. Most of the schools in the northwest where there is fighting ongoing have shut down. Many teachers have fled the area and are said to be in the capital

The students are concerned about the situation in the CAR
The students are concerned about the situation in the CAR

It is the first day of school, and students check the school board to find out which classes they will be attending. Roberts says

“Many students we spoke to expressed concern at the situation in their country. Like other teenagers in other African countries, they have big dreams with many looking to be doctors or  engineers. What they all agree on is after high school, they all want to pursue university education in other countries and not the CAR because of the prevailing situation.”

Pupils check their class lists
Pupils check their class lists

Employment in Bangui Robert investigates how people are continuing with work and life despite the difficulties they are facing in the CAR. The five kilometer market named so because it is 5 kilometers from the central business district is the largest open air market in Bangui, CAR.

Stalls at the K-cinq market
Stalls at the K-cinq market

Morning’s are quite busy but by afternoon, most people have left the CBD. Insecurity is one of the causes.

Empty afternoon streets of Bangui
Empty afternoon streets of Bangui

Unemployment in Bangui is high. There are no official figures but residents do whatever they can to put bread on the table.

The number of street kids in the capital has increased sharply over the last few months.

CCTV Africa cameraman Karuri Nyaga films street kids in the heart of Bangui.
CCTV Africa cameraman Karuri Nyaga films street kids in the heart of Bangui.

C.A.R Crisis escalates Since Robert Nagila visited the CAR the situation has continued to deteriorate. Up to 6-thousand children have also been recruited by warring militias in the Central African Republic, a senior UN official said on Friday. According to the UNICEF country representative in the Central African Republic, Souleymane Diabate, the number has roughly doubled from previous estimates.  @LauraJepson is working for  the International Medical Corps in the CAR. She directed us towards these accounts from children who are caught up in the conflict.



The United Nations has warned that the country is descending into complete chaos and has called for an urgent intervention; otherwise it risks religious conflict with mass atrocities and even civil war. On Monday 25th Nov 2013, French Foreign Minister, Laurent Fabius, said they were looking at sending additional troops to the country.



A senior official of the Economic Community of Central African States said that Central African Republic was “a failed State headed by a fragile transitional Government” and that it was powerless to bring the country out of the crisis. Though the International Support Mission to the Central African Republic (MISCA) has plans to increase its numbers from 2,500 to 3,600, leaders in the region are convinced little can be done without the authorisation of a U.N. peacekeeping operation.


Timeline of events in since the violence broke out


Analysis of the situation in CAR and what next for the UN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqFeHMlGdik Renewed fighting in Central African Republic More than 100 people were killed in fierce fighting between mainly Muslim former rebels now in charge of the country and a mix of local Christian militia and fighters loyal to the ousted-president Francois Bozize.  The former French colony has slipped into chaos since the predominantly Muslim rebel coalition, known as Seleka, seized power in March.

In March of this year the government of the Central African Republic (CAR) was overthrown. Francois Bozize the president of the republic was toppled in a coup led by a rebel group known as Seleka. The group was commanded by Michel Djotodia, Bozize’s Defence Minister before his resignation.


As the situation in the Central African Republic continues to escalate, different people continue to express their views on the violence in the C.A.R. Here are some of the views expressed on our Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/cctvafrica/posts/612647535451456

comments FB on CAR


CCTV’s Kate Parkinson is on the ground in the Central African Republic following the latest developments. She has captured dramatic scenes of continued violence in Bangui despite the recent introduction of French forces. On Thursday last week, more than 300 people were killed in Bangui following a clash between the Christian and Muslim rebels. Tensions still ripples across the impoverished nation as Seleka forces continue to patrol the streets of Bangui, defying an order by the French troops to return to their barracks. Calm did slowly returned to the Central African Republic on Sunday thanks to the intervention by the French troops.


Relative calm returned to the Central African Republic on Sunday 8th December after 3 days of heavy fighting. However, there was sporadic gunfire in some neighborhoods of the capital, Bangui, and members of Seleka – a mainly Muslim rebel group that seized power in March and has been fighting Christian militias ever since

Our correspondent, Kate Parkinson, sent us these photos from the country

French troops on patrol in Bangui
French troops on patrol in Bangui

 

A French troop patrols C.A.R's capital, Bangui
A French troop patrols C.A.R’s capital, Bangui
Weapons seized from armed militias on Monday during French disarmament mission
Weapons seized from armed militias on Monday during French disarmament mission

Relative calm returned to the Central African Republic after 3 days of heavy fighting. However, there is sporadic gunfire in some neighborhoods of Bangui, and members of Seleka a mainly Muslim rebel group that seized power in March and has been fighting Christian militias ever since. CCTV’s Kate Parkinson reports.

French troops have started disarming fighters in the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui after days of violence in which hundreds have been killed. There was a brief exchange of gunfire between armed men and French soldiers near the airport as the disarmament began. CCTV’s Kate Parkinson reports.

The Central African Republic’s President, Michel Djotodia, said French troops were in his country just to help restore constitutional order. He said once the necessary conditions are in place, he will consider shortening transitional rule. Djotodia spoke as France said it will start disarming fighters in the Central African Republic by force if necessary.

French President Francois Hollande defends France’s military intervention in the Central African Republic. He said the deployment of one thousand six hundred French troops was necessary to avoid carnage.

Violence in Central African Republic continues. Christian mob attack mosques belonging to Muslims as revenge in capital, Bangui. CCTV’s Kate Parkinson reports.

Aid agencies in the Central African Republic say the country is facing a dire humanitarian situation with more than half of the population in need of immediate assistance. The UN says more than half a million people have been displaced since the crisis started a year ago and a recent resurgence in violence in the capital Bangui, which left over 400 people dead, has forced over 100,000 people from their homes. Kate Parkinson reports.

Chaos continue in the Central African Republic as French troops backed by a helicopter trade fire with suspected former-rebels in A Bangui. This comes as France’s military chief Jean-Yves Le Drian arrived in the Central African Republic capital. CCTV’s Maria Galang reports.

The African peacekeeping force in Central African Republic is set to double raising hopes of an end to conflict.

According to the head of the U.N. World Food Programme, up to a quarter of the population of Central African Republic risks going hungry due to fighting between Christian and Muslim militia, and this number could increase.

The presence of French troops has instilled relative calm in the restive Central African Republic after days of sectarian violence. However, humanitarian workers are now warning of an outbreak of diseases spreading in the camps for the displaced. CCTV’s Jane Kiyo reports.

Thousands of displaced people in the C.A.R capital of Bangui received essential supplies on Wednesday. The supplies will see them through the crisis for the next few days.Most of these people have been at the airport camp site for almost two weeks, with very little relief supplies.

The newly created African Union peace mission to the restive Central African Republic officially takes over from existing contingent of peace keepers from central African states.The international support mission to the C.A.R known as MISCA expected to deploy for one year. This decision was endorsed by the UN Security Council.

Elections in the Central African Republic may be held a year earlier. This is according to the country’s Prime minister Nicolas Tiangaye. The announcement by Tiangaye, who is embroiled in a dispute with the country’s interim president Michel Djotodia, appears to be a move to speed up the transition, following the March coup. This came as the United States Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, made her maiden visit to the war ravaged country. CCTV’S Jane Kiyo reports.

Christian militia attack Muslim neighbourhoods in the capital of the Central African Republic. This comes as France appealed to European partners for assistance in quelling months of religious violence in its former colony. 29 bodies from northern neighborhoods of Bangui had been found following the clashes.

Religious leaders in the Central African Republic have been at the forefront to try to reconcile warring Christian and Muslim communities. But they say the face huge challenges in doing so, blaming the political class for religious tensions, as CCTV’S Jane Kiyo reports.

Like all other days the streets of Bangui remained largely deserted on Christmas day. No fanfare or people too scared to venture out with attacks between the Muslim and Christian militia still persisting.

Chadian troops who are part of the 3700 strong MISCA Force are accused of siding with the mainly muslim ex seleka rebels and have been the target of revenge attacks by the anti balaka fighters and their supporters.

Head of an International Committee of the Red Cross delegation Georgios Georgantas, said the 44 bodies found were probably only a fraction of those killed in Bangui in the last two days. Violence has been at extremely high levels in the Central African Republic. Hundreds of people have been fleeing from the fighting that raged for hours across Bangui.

Hundreds fled inter-religious violence in the C.A.R on Saturday, boarding emergency flights to neighbouring Chad. As nearby countries appealed for aid to get their citizens out. Reprisal attacks, between the predominantly Muslim Seleka rebels who seized power in March, & the mostly Christian Self-Defense Militias, have killed more than 1000 people this month, in the Capital city of Bangui. Clementine Logan has more.

More than 100,000 people displaced by inter-religious violence in Central African Republic are sheltering at a makeshift camp at Bangui airport. Humanitarian aid agency, Doctors Without Borders, says the number has doubled over the past week and is calling for urgent aid.

As the violent clashes continue in parts of the Central African Republic, concern is growing for the safety and security of hundreds of thousands of displaced people. The internal refugees are increasingly in danger of exploitation by armed groups and even unscrupulous traders, keen to make illicit profits from relief supplies. Susan Mwongeli reports.

More than a thousand people occupied the runway of the Central African Republic’s international airport on Tuesday, in an appeal to authorities to provide assistance to those displaced by inter-religious violence.

Fresh inter-religious clashes in the Central African Republic capital, have killed at least three people. Angry residents threw grenades and torched selected homes, on Wednesday. French and African troops deployed to the country have struggled to stop the retaliatory violence between Muslim Seleka rebels, and Christian Self-Defence militias.

The humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic is becoming dire. According to the UN refugee agency UNHCR violence has displaced nearly a million people, a fifth of the population. This it says is hampering aid efforts, particularly in the capital Bangui. In the meantime Medical Charity Doctors without borders has cut back operations at Bangui airport in a bid to reduce risk to staff and patients.Susan Mwongeli has more.

French public support for France’s military intervention in Central African Republic is rapidly waning a month since Paris deployed troops to quell sectarian violence in its former colony. According to a poll released on Saturday, only 41% of French residents support the move by France, down from 51% early last year. Maria Galang has more.

Over 935,000 civilians have been displaced due to the conflict in the Central African Republic. The humanitarian situation also remains dire, says the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. According to UN, over 500 thousand refugees are currently sheltering in 67 sites in the capital Bangui, or living with host families.

The UN says fighting in the Central African Republic is creating one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. Half the population in the landlocked country, now needs help. Violence has increased since a coup in March, and it has taken on a brutal, sectarian dimension now. The United Nations Security Council met to discuss the escalating problems, a month after it decided to send French troops to the country. CCTV’s Nick Harper reports.

Early reports from Chad indicate that the regional African leaders would discuss the future of the Central African Republic’s President, Michel Djotodia, in a bid to end the sectarian violence that’s ripping the country apart. Djotodia is thought to be facing pressure to step down amid frustration at his failure to end the religious violence. However, his government has rejected suggestions of Djotodia’s departure. CCTV’s Carol Oyola, takes up the story.

A UN human rights expert has called for urgent protection and increased assistance to the growing number of displaced people in the Central African Republic. Ted Chaiban specifically noted the need to strengthen the international community’s response to protect and assist those fleeing the violence, especially women, children, and people with disabilities.

Central African Republic President Michel Djotodia has resigned after intense pressure over his failure to stem deadly sectarian violence. According to a statement from an ongoing meeting in Chad, the leaders of the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) “noted the resignation” of Djotodia and his Prime Minister Nicolas Tiengaye. This story from CCTV’s Maria Galang

For further analysis on Djotodia’s resignation Ramah talked to CCTV’s Kate Parkinson & Thibaud Lesueur, an analyst on the C.A.R from the International Crisis Group.

French and African forces patrol Bangui as calm slowly returns to the city streets following months of violence. Despite the uneasy calm, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki moon has warned of further upheaval along religious lines . Ban Ki-moon further says that the past year’s events had profoundly damaged the relationship between Muslim and Christian communities and posed a long-term danger to the country.

The African Union is keen to ensure that peace returns to the troubled nation. CCTV’s Girum Chala spoke to the AU Commissioner for Political Affairs for more on this issue.

The head of the transitional body, Alexandre-Ferdinand Nguendet, who will be temporary head of state for a maximum of 15 days has appealed for calm .

Life is slowly going back to normal in the Central African Republic . Markets reopened on Sunday after months of instability drove most traders away. Following the resignation of interim president Michel Djotodia, Christian militia in the country are now taking positions vacated by Seleka fighters. Susan Mwongeli has more.

China’s Foreign Ministry’s Spokeswoman, Hua Chunying has expressed optimism that the C.A.R new interim leaders soon. More with Jiitu Abraham

Hundreds of soldiers and police have reportedly began returning to barracks following an order to do so by the new interim president in the Central African Republic. Alexandre-Ferdinand Nguendet condemned the actions of the mostly Muslim Seleka rebel group and the “anti-balaka” Christian fighters fighting them, and vowed that the “anarchy” that has gripped the country would be swiftly brought to an end.

The United Nations has warned that the conflict in the Central African Republic could turn into a genocide. Violence in the highly unstable country has not let up despite the resignation of Michel Djotodia last week. At least seven more people were killed in the capital Bangui overnight. CCTV’s Carol Oyola reports.

The search for a peacemaker president in the Central African Republic has begun. A special session of parliament convened to elect a new interim leader on Tuesday. French President Francois Hollande says his country does not plan to interfere in the C.A.R’s search for a leader. Aides to the current interim leader Alexandre-Ferdinand Nguendet say he will not be running for the top job.

When Bangui fell to Muslim Seleka rebels last March, that unleashed a wave of killing. The Christian anti-Balaka set up in response north of the capital – and carried out equally brutal revenge attacks. Now they’re jostling for political power. A transitional body, known as the CNT, is charged with choosing a new President. But the anti-balaka says Seleka dominates the body – and wants it changed.

EU meet on further military intervention in C.A.R. This would be the EU’s first major army operation in six years. The intervention by the 28-nation bloc comes after a senior U.N. official warned on Thursday of the risk of genocide, if there was not a more robust international response to the bloodshed.

The children’s release is the result of negotiations between U.N. representatives and the transitional authorities to allow unimpeded access to all military bases in the country. Since fighting intensified in December of last year, a great number of children had been recruited by the Seleka armed group now preparing to disarm.

As leaders from the European Union discuss a way out of the crisis in the Central African Republic, the violence continues. Two Muslim men reportedly killed and burnt by a Christian mob in the capital Bangui on Sunday- a sign of the worsening sectarian divide.

Eight candidates shortlisted for the position of the interim president to replace former Seleka leader Michel Djotodia resigned as president under international pressure over his failure to end the bloodshed.

A new leader for the troubled Central African Republic.. Elected in the second round, Catherine Samba-Panza, the mayor of Bangui, replaces Michel Djotodia, the leader of the Seleka rebels who seized power in March. Djotodia stepped down on January 10 under intense international pressure after failing to halt the inter-religious violence.

Central Africa Republic’s Interim President Catherine Samba Panza says security will be the top priority as her government hopes to offer new opportunities to the thousands of youth who took up arms since last March’s coup.

In Central African Republic, where the new interim leader is due to be sworn in. But as Catherine Samba-Panza prepares to formally assume office violence escalated in Bangui. Seven people died in inter-religious attacks and reprisal killings on Wednesday. These recent spate of attacks underline the challenge the new interim president faces in restoring peace. And the UN chief’s special adviser on genocide prevention has warned the country risks spiraling into genocide. CCTV’s Carol Oyola reports.

The United Nations is set to approve an EU military intervention in the Central African Republic to help stabilise the country, as fighting between muslim and Christian militia continues to escalate. But it’s not yet clear which European Union countries will contribute soldiers to the mission. CCTV’s Sandra Gathmann has this report on what the EU’s peacekeeping mission might involve.

A former health minister has been hacked to death in the capital of the Central African Republic, as clashes escalated a day after interim President Catherine Samba-Panza took office. Amnesty International reported that more than 50 Muslims had been killed in two attacks earlier this month in villages northwest of Bangui. CCTV’s Carol Oyola reports.

Bangui’s been in chaos since last year’s coup by Muslim rebels..The killing’s intensified since Christian militia swept into the capital almost two months ago.

Outside in the streets, mobs have cut down and burned other victims. There’ve been reports of cannibalism and the Capital of Bangui has been in chaos since last year’s coup by Muslim rebels.

Violence between Christians and Muslims continues despite the announcement of a new president.The EU troops will support the some 4000 strong African Union mission and 1600 French soldiers are already on the ground.

Thousands of African peacekeepers are in Bangui alongside 600 French troops. The United Nations has given approval for a small European force.

At the AU Summit 2014, CCTV’s Beatrice Marshall talked to Dr. Paul Simon – Head of Conflict Prevention Risk Analysis on the conflict that has rocked the Central African Republic.

Hundreds of Muslims especially those from Chad are still flooding out of the Central African Republic fearing sectarian reprisal attacks. With the vast majority of Seleka rebels coming from Chad, its nationals have become the biggest foreign targets in the mainly Christian capital of Bangui. CCTV’S Jane Kiyo reports from the city.

Taking baby steps towards restoring peace, order and reconciliation, a challenge interim Central African Republic president Catherine Samba Panza is taking in her stride in the midst of a conflict.

Insecurity in the Central African Republic is now affecting the distribution of much needed food supplies to hundreds of thousands of displaced people. The World Food Programme is now raising concerns about its dwindling emergency supplies due to insecurity along the border with Cameroon.

The Seleka rebel force split up and fled north and east as African and French peacekeepers retook the town.

Central African Republic soldiers lynched a suspected Seleka militia member at a military ceremony, Seleka militia are responsible for toppling the government which resulted in chaos and dearth which has engulfed that nation since.

The African peacekeeping force in the Central African Republic has condemned the lynching of a man by a mob of soldiers. The force’s spokesperson Eloi Yao said the mission was worried about causing further casualties if it interfered forcefully to stop the brutal killing. Soldiers claim the man killed on Wednesday was an informer to the Seleka rebels. Despite Wednesday’s killing, the situation in the capital Bangui showed slight signs of improvement following the easing of a night time curfew after weeks of violence and looting.

African troops fired over the heads of a mob that was trying to attack a convoy of fleeing families on Friday. Tens of thousands of Muslims are fleeing to Cameroon and Chad. Witnesses say an angry crowd killed and mutilated a man who fell from one of the trucks in the convoy. From Bangui, CCTV’s Jane Kiyo reports.

The African force, working alongside French troops, are trying to stop the worst of the violence. They’ve had some success but not enough to stop the sectarian violence that has rocked the country since March 2013. Hundreds have been killed with thousands being displaced.

8 people have been killed in revenge attacks in the capital Bangui. The attacks happened in Miskine, once a Muslim neighbourhood, which is now inhabited by Christians.

Muslim and Christian leaders are stressing the need for the violence plaguing the country to quickly come to an end. Three daylight lynchings were reported last week and thousands of Muslims have tried to flee to neighbouring Chad and Cameroon.

French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian who is on an official visit to C.A.R has warned that the conflict-torn country must not be allowed to split. He warned Christian militias formed after abuses by mainly Muslim Seleka rebels, who ruled the country for nine months, are waving a revenge cycle of bloodshed and emerging as the greatest threat to peace.

Amnesty international has warned that Christian -Muslim tensions may split the Central Africa Republic into two.

As incidents of violent attacks continue in the Central African Republic , France has warned that anti-Balaka militia are emerging as the main threat to peace in the country. French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian says those responsible for crimes should be punished .He was speaking on his latest visit to C.A.R.

CCTV correspondent Jane Kiyo recently returned from the Central African Republic which has seen atrocious acts of violence. She spoke to the New Media team on her experiences there especially the much condemned lynching.

Thousands of Muslims tried to flee the sectarian violence in the Central African Republic’s capital, only to be turned back by peacekeepers, as crowds of angry Christians gathered alongside the road shouted threats.

International peacekeepers have seized weapons from militia in the capital of the Central African Republic, which has been gripped by sectarian violence. The operation was carried out at the base of the mostly Christian militias whose attacks have driven many Muslims from the city in recent weeks.

At least thirteen bodies were excavated from a mass grave in the Central African Republic capital city Bangui on Monday. Officials say they have retrieved 13 bodies the mass grave was discovered at a fuelling station on a military camp where members of the mostly Muslim Seleka rebel group are currently based.

Lawlessness and violence continues to grip the Central African Republic and shows no sign of ending any time soon. President Catherine Samba Panza is currently visiting Chad, and has conceded that she is not able to guarantee the security of Muslims in the C.A.R but she hopes they would one day return.

The leader of former rebel forces in the Central African Republic, Seleka has warned that the structure of the state is at risk of disappearing, if action is not taken and international forces in the country are not reinforced. The general spoke as heavy fighting was reported near the airport in C.A.R’s capital Bangui after Christian militia Anti-Balaka tried to block the evacuation of Muslim.

U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki moon has once again appealed to the international community to urgently act on the Crisis in the Central African Republic . Ban ki Moon says the situation in C.A.R threatens to spiral into genocide and wants the international community to send another 3,000 troops and police in an effort to stop violence between Christians and Muslims.

The African Union is not convinced more troops are needed. As CCTV’s Girum Chala reports, AU officials say they want to give the current African force, known as MISCA, more time.

French and African Union troops are struggling to restore stability in the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui. The UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon has called for the urgent deployment of at least three thousand extra troops to protect civilians against the country’s spiraling violence.

The African-led International Support Mission in the Central African Republic has foiled an attempt by anti Balaka militia leaders to escape from the Bangui prison. They reportedly received help from the head of the prison. The anti-Balaka leaders were arrested by the UN mission, MISCA, during an operation conducted two weeks ago in Bangui.

France has said it believes the Anti Balaka militia is the main obstacle to peace in war torn Central African Republic which has been rocked by sectarian violence since march 2013.

France’s parliament has approved extending what was meant to be a short term military deployment to stem the wave of violence in the Central African Republic. CCTV’s Kate Parkinson reports.

French President Francois Hollande is expected in the Central African Republic capital, Bangui today. This is his second visit since he sent troops to try and quell sectarian violence in the country.

Thousands of refugees from the Central African Republic have fled the violence in their home country, only to endure an even more desperate situation once they cross the border. Although they are safe they are unable to access clean water, food and proper shelter.

French President Francois Hollande has said the partition of Central Africa Republic should be avoided at all cost, after Arriving in Bangui from Nigeria he added the French troops in the country would continue to disarm militias and bandits fighting local Muslims to avoid the country being partitioned.

Though there has been a lull in the fighting many residents are still too scared to go back to their homes, a number of which were pillaged and vandalized during attacks. With these new peace efforts, it is hoped the nation’s brutal sectarian conflict will eventually be resolved.

An early start to the rainy season in Central African Republic has worsened the plight of hundreds of thousands of people sheltering from religious violence in makeshift camps. With Aid workers warning that the risk of malaria and dysentery, has now risen.

As sectarian violence threatens to pull the Central African Republic apart the U.N. has proposed sending a 12,000 strong peacekeeping force to the divided nation. Aid agencies say more relief is needed quickly as the rainy season approaches but substantial action is likely to take some time. CCTV’s William Denselow reports.

Christians have been burning mosques in what they say is revenge for the violence of the primarily Muslim rebel Seleka movement. President  Michel Djotodia who was brought to power by these rebels says he cannot be held responsible for the sectarian violence that has gripped his country.

Religious leaders in the Central African Republic are seeking reconciliation between Muslims and Christians in the capital Bangui.

http://www.youtube.com Chaos continue in the Central African Republic as French troops backed by a helicopter trade fire with suspected former-rebels in A Bangui.  This comes as France’s military chief Jean-Yves Le Drian arrived in the Central African Republic capital. CCTV’s Maria Galang reports.

The interim leader Michel Djotodia, is weighing a possible amnesty for militias involved in Christian-Muslim violence that has killed hundreds of people, in exchange for their disarmament. Djotodia confirmed on Saturday the group was demanding inclusion in the transitional government he leads. In a sign of continued instability, Djotodia dismissed three members government on Sunday, including Security Minister Josue Binoua. Meanwhile more African Union troops have started arriving in the Central African Republic to boost the UN-backed peacekeeping force. wht remains uncertain is  whether the joint AU-French intervention can stop the chaos and sectarian killings remains uncertain.


The Central African Republic’s interim president Michel Djotodia is considering amnesty for militias involved in Christian-Muslim violence, in exchange for their disarmament. The majority-Christian country has been paralyzed by cycles of killing, torture and looting since Djotodia’s mainly Muslim Seleka rebels seized power in March. The rebel leader turned interim president has since lost control of his former fighters, whose abuses have led to the emergence of Christian militias, known as the anti-balaka.

The head of the U.N. World Food Programme said on Monday that up to a quarter of the population of Central African Republic risks going hungry due to fighting between Christian and Muslim militia, and this number could increase,. But Guy Adoua, the deputy WFP representative for Central African Republic, said the food distribution was a good start. A few attempts to distribute food were stopped because of fears of rioting and stabbings as thousands of people tried to get as close as possible to food trucks

The presence of French troops has instilled relative calm in the restive Central African Republic, after days of sectarian violence. However, humanitarian workers are now warning of an outbreak of diseases spreading in the camps for the displaced. France has now deployed 1,600 troops to the country, while the African Union has authorised its force in the CAR to increase from 2,500 to 6,000 soldiers, with the first batches of additional Congolese and Burundian peacekeepers arriving last week. Europe is also set to boost more troops in the country.

 

The ongoing violence in the Central African Republic has seen hundreds killed in a week long bloodshed which started 5th December.’
France has since deployed 1600 troops in a bid to prevent worsening violence between Christian militias and largely Muslim Seleka rebels.
Our correspondent, Kate Parkinson, has been in the country and sent us these images.

With the coming rains, aid agencies are rushing mosquito nets to displaced families around the Central African Republic, to help prevent malaria. The disease is one of the leading causes of child deaths in the country. And, even before fighting broke out, only about a third of children slept under mosquito nets.

Months of chaos have crippled public services in C.A.R and schools have been hard hit. But in recent days, some stability has returned to the capital, Bangui. And children are slowly returning to the classroom. Jane Kiyo has more.

The situation in the Central African Republic remains dire with many having either fled the conflict or living as internally displaced persons in the country. Prisca Koyonli, one of thousands of mothers in the capital, Bangui, have been struggling to survive as their city fell apart

Hundreds of men, women and children are still trapped under siege in the capital, Bangui. Christian militia known as the anti-balaka have engaged in a ruthless campaign – which the UN says amounts to ethnic cleansing. Now the gunmen have surrounded the city’s sole surviving Muslim suburb, PK5. CCTV’s Jane Kiyo managed to get through the blockade and filed this exclusive report.

Former Seleka rebels say they have no regrets about toppling the Central African Republic government. Hundreds of them are confined to camps disarmed and desperate. But they say they deserve a place in the country’s reconstruction. CCTV’s Jane Kiyo reports

Our correspondent, Kate Parkinson was recently in the country and sent us these images

 

Religious leaders from  have asked the US to intervene to halt the bloodshed in their country. The interfaith trio have been lobbying in Washington DC before heading to Europe, where they’ll deliver the same message: that the international community needs to act now, before it’s too late. CCTV’s Nina-Maria Potts reports.

The UN World Food Program has said there is an urgent need to deliver aid to the Central African Republic so has farmers do not miss the current planting season and give rise to food crisis.

The government in the Central African Republic has warned gunmen in Bangui to hand over their weapons or be considered military targets. Militia known as the anti-balaka have been indiscriminately hunting Muslims in the capital and have killed many.

The United Nations Human Rights chief has criticised the response from the international community to the ongoing conflict in the Central African Republic. Navi Pillay has been in the C.A.R for the past two days and has called for the urgent deployment of a peacekeeping force – and for more aid.

The French commander of a European Union peacekeeping force that had been due to deploy in the Central African Republic this week says there is a shortage of soldiers. General Philippe Ponties says the deployment hinged on the creation of a logistical unit of around 100 personnel, and the shortage of volunteers is worrying.

A year on from the coup, the Central African Republic is still struggling. But the United Nations has many crises clamouring for its attention and resources. And officials fear the CAR is slipping off the radar. CCTV’s Nick Harper reports from the UN headquarters in New York.

At least nine people have been killed in fighting in the Central African Republic’s capital Bangui. The latest deaths add to a toll of thousands since a Seleka rebel coalition seized power a year ago. The anti-Balaka Christian militia continue to stage revenge attacks the latest gunfight took place in the restive PK5 Muslim neighborhood.